Displaying items by tag: consumption

Thursday, 29 July 2021 17:09

Eurofish Magazine 4 2021 featuring Italy

EM4 2021Eurofish Magazine issue 4 2021 looks at the fisheries sector in Itlay and how the fishing fleets adapt to the pandemic. Consumption in Croatia is also reviewed as well as carp farming in Serbia.  The species profile looks at Musky octopus (Eledone moschata).
Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator

EM3 20 TM Corona1Globalisation will remain an indispensable part of the fish industry

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 3 2020.

The coronavirus has largely brought public life to a standstill. Stock markets have plunged into the red, freedom of movement has been severely restricted in some places, and the consequences for the global economy are not foreseeable. One thing is certain, however: the longer the standstill lasts, the more profound will be the disruption in the global fish industry. Familiar market structures could change, raising fears and anxieties about the future for many of those affected.

Published in Trade and Markets

EM 2 20 Fish consIn 2020–2023, the Ministry of Rural Affairs is planning a campaign to introduce and raise awareness of fishing and aquaculture products in Estonia. The aim of the campaign is to motivate Estonians to eat more fish, and to expand consumption of fish in the broadest sense.

Current consumption of fishing and aquaculture products in Estonia is significantly lower than the average of Estonia’s neighbours or of the EU, where per capita consumption of seafood is 25 kg per year (EUMOFA). Estonians consume some 17 kg of fish per person annually. This amount includes both consumption at home and away from home. In comparison, more fish was consumed in the past: about 30 kg per person annually in 1970, 25 kg in 1980, and 23 kg in 1989. These amounts should, of course, be considered in light of the fact that the trade, availability of food products, and selection were significantly different back then compared to the current situation.

Published in Estonia

EM1 20 NOPutting fish back on the menu

Featured in EUROFISH Magazine 1/2020

 

Seafood is declining in popularity in Norway, a country with one of the world’s highest figures for per capita consumption. Falling interest in seafood is prompting the authorities and institutions to find out the reasons behind this development and devise ways to counter it.

Norway is the world’s largest exporter of fish and seafood in terms of value after China. The country is however not only an impressive exporter but is also an avid consumer of fish and seafood products. Within Europe, it is only the Icelandics and the Portuguese who eat more seafood than the Norwegians. However, as in many countries, even those with a long tradition of eating seafood, consumption in Norway is declining. Seafood is associated with a number of health benefits both in children and adults. Falling fish consumption therefore can have repercussions on public health, so a number of initiatives backed by a network of public and private institutions have been put in place to reverse this trend.

Among these is the Norwegian Directorate of Health, a body with a mandate to improve the general level of health among Norwegians. A recent report from the directorate analyses developments in the Norwegian diet. What people eat is among the factors closely related to the risks of developing illnesses and of premature death and the directorate’s recommendations regarding diet, nutrition, and physical activity are intended to reduce these risks. The sustainability of a diet is also an aspect that is taken into consideration when making national recommendations today and a healthy diet, meaning one with a high content of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain products and a low content of red and processed meats, is generally more sustainable. The report finds that the development in Norwegian eating habits between 2008 and 2018 has been mixed. Sugar and milk consumption declined, that of vegetables increased, consumption of meat decreased slightly, while that of fish fell considerably. In 2018, Norwegians ate 2.6 times more meat than fish, a figure that was 2.2 in 2008.

Published in Norway

CEM3 19 TM Russia consumption DSC 9060onsumer survey yields vital insights in consumer habits

The second Global Fishery Forum, which was held on 13-15 September 2018 in St. Petersburg, Russia, offered an extensive programme covering various emerging topics from global fishing activities and projections for 2050, development of aquaculture, global consumer markets, technologies, and popularisation of Russian fish products.

During the second day of the Global Fishery Forum, the conference “Russian fish: a strategy for promoting Russian fish on the Russian market”, gathered experts for discussion on how to increase fish consumption. The main questions looked at understanding what Russian consumers eat and what producers are offering them, consumer awareness and the role of mass-media in this process, what can be done to stimulate consumer demand on the market, and opportunities for retail chains to increase consumption of fisheries products in the country.   

Herring is the most-consumed fish in Russia

In 2016, consumption of fish and seafood products in Russia was at 21.1 kg per capita (live weight equivalent), according to the research carried out by the All-Russian Association of Fish Breeders, Entrepreneurs and Exporters (VARPE). The market size was estimated at more than 3 million tonnes of fisheries products. Herring was the leading species with 2.81 kg per capita consumption, followed by salmon species (2.73 kg per capita), Alaska pollock (2.59 kg per capita), cod (2 kg per capita) and mackerel (1.9 kg per capita). These 5 top species make up 12 kg per capita or more than 56% of all fish and seafood products in the country. Consumption of squid, shrimp and crab was about 0.6, 0.25 and 0.14 kg per capita respectively, representing about 5% of the total fish and seafood consumption in the country. 

Published in Trade and Markets

EM2 18 News Int AnchovyItalyItaly is the world’s fourth largest producer of anchovy with 37,511 tonnes caught in 2015 according to the latest EUMOFA Case Study: Processed Anchovy in Italy. Italian anchovy is consumed fresh or processed as salted anchovy, anchovy in oil, or marinated anchovy. This case study, published in February, focuses on salted anchovy and anchovy in oil. Italian anchovy production is broken into two types; Small-scale production marketed regionally and industrial scale production, based partly on imports from countries like Albania, Morocco, and Tunisia, of which circa three fourths is sold within Italy and the rest is exported. In 2015 imports of anchovy reached a little over 26,000 tonnes while about 20,000 tonnes were exported and some 44,000 tonnes were consumed in Italy. For one kilogram of processed anchovy (preserved in oil or salted) between 1,9 and 2,3 kg of fresh anchovy is needed due to losses during the different production stages. Fish accounts for 9% to 20% of the cost of the final product to consumers which ranges from EUR28/kg  to EUR53/kg for small-scale production of anchovy preserved in olive oil in the Ligurian area. Labour costs account for 14%-16%  while distribution costs account for the largest share (between 28% and 53%) of the final consumer price. More detailed information is available online at www.eumofa.eu/eumofa-publications.

Published in Latest News