Displaying items by tag: norway

Tuesday, 16 February 2021 13:39

Boosting global demand for Norwegian seafood

EM1 21 GP R Larsen NSCThe Norwegian Seafood Council celebrates its 50th anniversary

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 1 / 2021.

The Norwegian Seafood Council is the highly successful trade promotion body for the Norwegian fisheries and aquaculture industries. Owned by the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, the council is a public company with a mandate to increase the value of Norwegian seafood in a responsible manner. Renate Larsen, managing director of the council, discusses here the organisation’s response to the pandemic, its recent achievements, and future challenges.

Published in Opinions
Tuesday, 16 February 2021 12:34

Brexit offers more opportunities than challenges

EM1 21 N BrexitChanges to the UK Norway relationship are inevitable but hardly insurmountable

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 1 / 2021.


The solid ties between Norway and the UK will provide a healthy foundation for the two countries’ relationship from January 2021.

Published in Norway

EM1 2021Eurofish Magazine issue 1 2021 features the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in Estonia, Norway and Ukraine. The Species section looks at the invasive gobies species.
Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator

EM1 21 News Int NorwayNorway exported 2.7 million tonnes of seafood worth NOK 105.7 billion (~EUR 10.2 billion) in 2020. This is the second-highest value ever and is the equivalent to 37 million meals every day throughout the year or 25,000 meals per minute. The total volume of seafood exports increased by 2 per cent in 2020, while the value was reduced by 1 per cent, or NOK 1.5 billion, compared with the record year of 2019. Seafood exports for the second year in a row exceeded the ‘magical’ NOK 100 billion mark and that this was achieved during the corona pandemic in 2020 was fantastic, said Odd Emil Ingebrigtsen, Minister of Fisheries and Seafood.

Published in Latest News

EM1 20 NOPutting fish back on the menu

Featured in EUROFISH Magazine 1/2020

 

Seafood is declining in popularity in Norway, a country with one of the world’s highest figures for per capita consumption. Falling interest in seafood is prompting the authorities and institutions to find out the reasons behind this development and devise ways to counter it.

Norway is the world’s largest exporter of fish and seafood in terms of value after China. The country is however not only an impressive exporter but is also an avid consumer of fish and seafood products. Within Europe, it is only the Icelandics and the Portuguese who eat more seafood than the Norwegians. However, as in many countries, even those with a long tradition of eating seafood, consumption in Norway is declining. Seafood is associated with a number of health benefits both in children and adults. Falling fish consumption therefore can have repercussions on public health, so a number of initiatives backed by a network of public and private institutions have been put in place to reverse this trend.

Among these is the Norwegian Directorate of Health, a body with a mandate to improve the general level of health among Norwegians. A recent report from the directorate analyses developments in the Norwegian diet. What people eat is among the factors closely related to the risks of developing illnesses and of premature death and the directorate’s recommendations regarding diet, nutrition, and physical activity are intended to reduce these risks. The sustainability of a diet is also an aspect that is taken into consideration when making national recommendations today and a healthy diet, meaning one with a high content of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain products and a low content of red and processed meats, is generally more sustainable. The report finds that the development in Norwegian eating habits between 2008 and 2018 has been mixed. Sugar and milk consumption declined, that of vegetables increased, consumption of meat decreased slightly, while that of fish fell considerably. In 2018, Norwegians ate 2.6 times more meat than fish, a figure that was 2.2 in 2008.

Published in Norway

EM1 2020Eurofish Magazine issue 1 2020 features the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in Norway, Hungary and Uzbekistan. The Species section looks at red king crab and whether it is a resource or a threat.

Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator

January / February 2020 EM 1
Country profile: Norway, Hungary, Uzbekistan
Events: World Tuna Conference 2020
Aquaculture:
Climate change accelerated the development of algal blooms
Spicies: King crab - Valuable commercial resource or ecological problem?
Guest pages: Martyn Boyers - Grimsby Fish Market bids farewell to the EU but not to Europe - A hub for trade in cod and haddock

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues

EM6 19 News Int OrivoA new testing platform, developed by Norway-based Orivo in collaboration with BioMar, makes use of advanced DNA-technology. The test determines the species composition of marine ingredients with a high level of precision, able to detect the presence of even very small amounts of DNA. BioMar believes that DNA-testing of marine ingredients in the aquaculture industry is a natural answer to the demand from customers and stakeholders for improved transparency and traceability throughout the seafood value chain.

Published in Latest News
Tuesday, 06 August 2019 10:12

Fresh salmon, safely packed

EM4 19 TECH Mosca Mowi Straps1A stainless steel strapping machine from Mosca proves itself at Mowi, Norway

The global salmon indsutry is booming. In 2017, the leading countires in this sector produced over two millions tons of the popular food fish.  The increasinly competitive salmon industry is driving companies to find ways to maximixe products yield and quality. One methode of acheving this feat is through the carfeull cordination of all phases of the production proces – from spawning to packaging. Mowi, previously Marine Harvest, the world’s largest supplier of farmed Atlantic Salmon recently tested a new stainless-steel strapping machine specially developed for the food industry with the hope of increasing coordination between their phases of the production process. Integrated into a fully automated production line in Ulvan, Norway, the Mosca Evolution SoniXs MS-6-VA has been strapping Styrofoam boxes packed with fresh fish since October 2017. Thus far, everyone at Mowi Norway, and Ulvan – from management staff to machine operators – is extremely impressed by the reliable, easy-to-clean strapping machine innovation.

When fresh salmon arrives by boat at the Mowi factory on the Norwegian island of Ulvoya, the clock is on. All companies in the business of selling fresh fish understand the consequences of even being one hour behind schedule. In a fully automated operation, the fish is packed at a temperature of below 2 °C in styrofoam boxes that are filled with ice and covered with an unfastened lid. The boxes are then double strapped to secure the lid and provide protection with added stability. Afterwards, they are loaded onto pallets for transport and leave the factory on a truck. Mowi has more than 13,000 employees working at locations in 25 countries. In 2016, the company produced 381,000 tons of fresh salmon. Some of this fish is processed in-house, for example, to make breaded or marinated fish fillets.

Published in Technology
Page 1 of 2