Displaying items by tag: fish

Wednesday, 09 December 2020 08:43

Fish counters set the stage for seafood sales

EM6 20 TECH display equipmentMaintaining freshness and quality, stimulating purchases

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 6 / 2020.

Fish and seafood are perishable foods and their presentation in retail outlets requires special counter concepts that have to meet a variety of requirements. The design of the refrigerated counters, display cases and other sales furniture at fishmongers and in supermarket fish departments contributes strongly to maintaining product quality and also influences customers’ buying behaviour.

Published in Technology

EM1 21 News Int CroatiaOver the last few years, Croatia has set a path to introduce electronic data delivery for the entire fisheries sector. The progress is evident and the introduction of electronic data delivery is very well accepted by the end-users - fishermen, farmers, buyers and the administration itself. Commercial fishers can deliver catch and landings data on paper (logbooks or reports), electronically through e-logbooks, via an app, or by email. Up until now, nearly 40% of the fishing fleet delivers daily catch and landing data electronically/digitally or by mobile application. What is even more significant is that these data cover nearly 98% of the catch.

Published in Latest News

EM4 20 BlockchainA new basis for international business

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 4 / 2020.

“Blockchain” is for many people still little more than a buzzword they may have heard about in connection with the digital currency bitcoins. But in fact blockchain and artificial intelligence are developing into leading technologies that are “revolutionizing” many areas of the economy. Blockchains provide transparency, enable more control, and simplify traceability in business relationships.

Published in Technology

EM3 20 FISH auctions1Competition for fish is becoming increasingly international

This article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 3 2020.

The basic idea behind auctions is very old: the goods on offer will be sold to the highest bidder. This method – which is also used to auction fish and seafood – is as simple as it is successful. But the advancement of digital technologies is now making its mark in this area. Many auctions have completed the step into the modern age and are using the possibilities of the internet to prepare themselves for the global fish business.

In many regions of the world it is common practice for fishermen to sell what they catch to just one or only a few wholesalers. This can work, but it has the disadvantage that the fishermen are dependent on the trader and are sometimes not paid fairly because the trader dictates the prices. That is why quite a lot of fishermen consider auctions to be the better method for first hand sale in the fish marketing chain. The principle of auctioning fish catches and selling to the highest bidder is not new and has in some places proven itself for decades. The bell that heralded the opening of the daily fish auction in Honolulu rang for the first time in 1952, and the Tsukiji fish market which closed down just recently in Tokyo, where it counted 900 licensed traders who handled around 1,600 tonnes of fish and seafood a day, was opened as early as 1935. The roots of the Norwegian Sildesalgslag go back to 1927, and Sweden’s largest fish auction in the port of Gothenburg even dates back to 1910. The idea of bringing together suppliers and potential buyers for trading certain goods such as fish and seafood under regulated conditions offers several advantages from which fishermen, traders and ultimately consumers all benefit equally because a constant supply of fresh produce is guaranteed every day.

Published in Fisheries
Wednesday, 05 February 2020 11:44

Innovative production of fish in Poland

EM2 20 News Int PolandThe National Marine Fisheries Research Institute in Gdynia along with the Ministry of Maritime Economy and Inland Navigation, the Inland Fisheries Institute in Olsztyn, and the Sturgeon Producers Organization in Toruń, held a scientific conference entitled “Innovative and traditional production of fish in Poland” as part of the International Green Week Berlin,  an international food, agriculture, and gardening exhibition, popular with consumers and trade visitors but also among representatives of the fisheries and scientific sectors from various EU countries. The large turnout and lively discussions justify the promotion of Polish fish products on the foreign food markets. Creating a positive image of Polish fish products on the German market is particularly important because it is the most important importer of Polish fish products. Two important directions of fish production in Poland were discussed: traditional fishing with its centuries of history, and fish farming in natural conditions, in which the wellbeing of the fish is preserved was one topic, while innovative methods focusing on the use of specialized, modern, and technologically advanced equipment and integrated recirculation systems in fish farming, was the other.

 

Published in Latest News

EM2 20 News Int MauritaniaLuis Planas, the Spanish Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, has stated that an alternative will be found for the transportation of Mauritanian fish to Spain. Last year this freight suffered delays and losses due to the blockage of the only road from Mauritania to the north by Sahrawi activists. Mr Planas visited the Mauritanian capital Nouakchott to negotiate with the Mauritanian authorities regarding problems related to the renewal of the Euro-Mauritanian fishing agreement. 

Published in Latest News
Friday, 13 March 2020 14:05

Gates invests in Greek fish

EM2 20 News Int GatesFish farming may not be the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about Bill Gates, but the philanthropist has made an investment in Greek aquaculture company Philosofish, Ekathimerini.com reports.  The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has already supported Greek-owned fund Diorasis, which already has invested in Philosofish (formerly Bitsakos Fish Farming) and has also invested in WorldFish, focusing on fish farming in the developing world, so aquaculture is no new thing.

Philosofish is now the second largest Greek seabass and sea bream farming company thanks to the European Commission’s approval last year of rival Andromeda’s acquisition of Selonda and Nireus. The three-way merger could only be sanctioned through the sale of Nireus and Selonda assets to a third party. One of these was Philosofish, which subsequently added 12,000 tonnes to its existing 5,000 tonnes annual capacity in addition to taking over other assets. Sources say that additional funding by a top investment entity may find its way to the Greek company in the near future.

Published in Latest News

EM1 20 NOPutting fish back on the menu

Featured in EUROFISH Magazine 1/2020

 

Seafood is declining in popularity in Norway, a country with one of the world’s highest figures for per capita consumption. Falling interest in seafood is prompting the authorities and institutions to find out the reasons behind this development and devise ways to counter it.

Norway is the world’s largest exporter of fish and seafood in terms of value after China. The country is however not only an impressive exporter but is also an avid consumer of fish and seafood products. Within Europe, it is only the Icelandics and the Portuguese who eat more seafood than the Norwegians. However, as in many countries, even those with a long tradition of eating seafood, consumption in Norway is declining. Seafood is associated with a number of health benefits both in children and adults. Falling fish consumption therefore can have repercussions on public health, so a number of initiatives backed by a network of public and private institutions have been put in place to reverse this trend.

Among these is the Norwegian Directorate of Health, a body with a mandate to improve the general level of health among Norwegians. A recent report from the directorate analyses developments in the Norwegian diet. What people eat is among the factors closely related to the risks of developing illnesses and of premature death and the directorate’s recommendations regarding diet, nutrition, and physical activity are intended to reduce these risks. The sustainability of a diet is also an aspect that is taken into consideration when making national recommendations today and a healthy diet, meaning one with a high content of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain products and a low content of red and processed meats, is generally more sustainable. The report finds that the development in Norwegian eating habits between 2008 and 2018 has been mixed. Sugar and milk consumption declined, that of vegetables increased, consumption of meat decreased slightly, while that of fish fell considerably. In 2018, Norwegians ate 2.6 times more meat than fish, a figure that was 2.2 in 2008.

Published in Norway
Tuesday, 06 August 2019 10:27

Technology for the aquaculture industry

EM4 19 TECH Fiap belt feederThe belt feeder that doesn’t require electric power

The FIAP Belt Feeder offers the perfect combination of reliability, flexibility and cost-effectiveness without bearing an unreasonable price tag.

Published in Technology
Tuesday, 06 August 2019 10:12

Fresh salmon, safely packed

EM4 19 TECH Mosca Mowi Straps1A stainless steel strapping machine from Mosca proves itself at Mowi, Norway

The global salmon indsutry is booming. In 2017, the leading countires in this sector produced over two millions tons of the popular food fish.  The increasinly competitive salmon industry is driving companies to find ways to maximixe products yield and quality. One methode of acheving this feat is through the carfeull cordination of all phases of the production proces – from spawning to packaging. Mowi, previously Marine Harvest, the world’s largest supplier of farmed Atlantic Salmon recently tested a new stainless-steel strapping machine specially developed for the food industry with the hope of increasing coordination between their phases of the production process. Integrated into a fully automated production line in Ulvan, Norway, the Mosca Evolution SoniXs MS-6-VA has been strapping Styrofoam boxes packed with fresh fish since October 2017. Thus far, everyone at Mowi Norway, and Ulvan – from management staff to machine operators – is extremely impressed by the reliable, easy-to-clean strapping machine innovation.

When fresh salmon arrives by boat at the Mowi factory on the Norwegian island of Ulvoya, the clock is on. All companies in the business of selling fresh fish understand the consequences of even being one hour behind schedule. In a fully automated operation, the fish is packed at a temperature of below 2 °C in styrofoam boxes that are filled with ice and covered with an unfastened lid. The boxes are then double strapped to secure the lid and provide protection with added stability. Afterwards, they are loaded onto pallets for transport and leave the factory on a truck. Mowi has more than 13,000 employees working at locations in 25 countries. In 2016, the company produced 381,000 tons of fresh salmon. Some of this fish is processed in-house, for example, to make breaded or marinated fish fillets.

Published in Technology
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