Countries

EM3 20 ALThis article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 3 2020.

A project consortium with partners from Albania and Croatia intends to improve the skills of fishermen by developing a master’s degree in marine fisheries and by upgrading vocational training to provide Albanian fishermen with internationally recognized skills. The agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors are the main employers in Albania with a share of more than 40%. With regards to fisheries, Albania, as an EU candidate country, is obliged to conduct reforms before it can implement the EU Common Fisheries Policy. At the same time, there is a trend to expand the Albanian fishing fleet with more trawlers and purse seiners. Compared to other Mediterranean fishing fleets, however, Albania’s fleet is small, accounting for less than 1% of the total.

EM3 20 KZ1Significant potential to be realised

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 3 2020.

Capture fisheries production in Kazakhstan comes from the waters of the Caspian and Aral Seas, Balkhash, Zaysan lakes, Bukhtarma, Kapshagai, Shardara reservoirs, Alakol system of lakes and other ponds with a total area of over three million hectares. More than 70 fish species live here, including the most commercially valuable (zander, common carp, grass carp, silver carp, whitefish).

Thursday, 16 April 2020 08:57

The seafood sector in Saudi Arabia

 EM 2 20 Saudi Arabia aquacultureA vision for growth is being realised

This article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 2 2020.

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is famous for its vast oil reserves, a quarter of the world’s total, and for the dominance of its economy by petroleum and associated industries. However, growing diversification of the Saudi economy has benefited some sectors. In agriculture the Kingdom is now self-sufficient in the production of milk, eggs, wheat, and other commodities. In addition, the country is a major exporter of fruits, vegetables, dairy products and fish and seafood to markets around the world.

EM 2 20 Fish consIn 2020–2023, the Ministry of Rural Affairs is planning a campaign to introduce and raise awareness of fishing and aquaculture products in Estonia. The aim of the campaign is to motivate Estonians to eat more fish, and to expand consumption of fish in the broadest sense.

Current consumption of fishing and aquaculture products in Estonia is significantly lower than the average of Estonia’s neighbours or of the EU, where per capita consumption of seafood is 25 kg per year (EUMOFA). Estonians consume some 17 kg of fish per person annually. This amount includes both consumption at home and away from home. In comparison, more fish was consumed in the past: about 30 kg per person annually in 1970, 25 kg in 1980, and 23 kg in 1989. These amounts should, of course, be considered in light of the fact that the trade, availability of food products, and selection were significantly different back then compared to the current situation.

Thursday, 16 April 2020 08:01

New tools help identify alien species

At the University of Oviedo in Asturias, Alba Ardura (left), Prof. Yaisel J. Borrell, and Prof. Eva Garcia-Vazquez are working on invasive species.This article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 2 2020.

Researchers at the University of Oviedo work to prevent the spread of invasive alien species through research and outreach. Invasive alien species are among the most serious threats to biodiversity in the EU and are particularly damaging to vulnerable ecosystems such as those found on islands.

Invasive alien species (IAS) can bring important economic and social benefits to society in the short term but may have deleterious impacts on natural resources that can last for generations. A report by the European Environmental Agency in 2012 estimated the impact of IAS on human life and health, and damage to agriculture, forestry, and fisheries to be in the range of EUR12bn per year in Europe.

EM 2 20 Alicia Villauriz IglesiasThis article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 2 2020.
Dña. Alicia Villauriz Iglesias, the Secretary General for Fisheries, has a long history at top levels of the administration of the Spanish agriculture, fisheries, and food sectors with experience both from within Spain and outside. She outlines here some of the issues facing the Spanish fisheries sector and the measures her administration is taking to address them.

EM1 20 HUPond farming should be better acknowledged

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 1 / 2020

Modern pond aquaculture production originates in the Danube basin, and in the European Union about 60% of it is still connected with this catchment area. The biogeographic features of pond aquaculture production define the spectrum of produced species and applied technologies.

Fishpond production dominates Hungarian aquaculture with an output of 81% of the total in 2018, according to the Research Institute of Agricultural Economics (AKI). Fishponds are defined as artificial structures which can be fully filled and drained through their monks. The average fish pond is 30-40 ha in Hungary and there are mainly two types: barrage ponds in hilly areas and paddy ponds mainly on the plains.

EM1 20 UZAmbitious strategy charts out aquaculture development

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 1/2020

Fish production in the Republic of Uzbekistan comes primarily from inland capture fishing and fish farming. The latter is mainly the extensive pond production of silver carp and common carp, but plans are afoot to expand this to other species using water-conserving technologies.

Uzbekistan is a landlocked country situated in the middle of Central Asia and has an area of about 450,000 km2. The country has a typical inland climate with marked seasonal temperature fluctuations, i.e. hot summers and cold winters. The average temperature in summer is about 27 оС often rising to more than 40 оС in the daytime, while the average temperature in February is -6 to -8 оС.

Better care of water resources would increase sector potential

EM1 20 NOPutting fish back on the menu

Featured in EUROFISH Magazine 1/2020

 

Seafood is declining in popularity in Norway, a country with one of the world’s highest figures for per capita consumption. Falling interest in seafood is prompting the authorities and institutions to find out the reasons behind this development and devise ways to counter it.

Norway is the world’s largest exporter of fish and seafood in terms of value after China. The country is however not only an impressive exporter but is also an avid consumer of fish and seafood products. Within Europe, it is only the Icelandics and the Portuguese who eat more seafood than the Norwegians. However, as in many countries, even those with a long tradition of eating seafood, consumption in Norway is declining. Seafood is associated with a number of health benefits both in children and adults. Falling fish consumption therefore can have repercussions on public health, so a number of initiatives backed by a network of public and private institutions have been put in place to reverse this trend.

Among these is the Norwegian Directorate of Health, a body with a mandate to improve the general level of health among Norwegians. A recent report from the directorate analyses developments in the Norwegian diet. What people eat is among the factors closely related to the risks of developing illnesses and of premature death and the directorate’s recommendations regarding diet, nutrition, and physical activity are intended to reduce these risks. The sustainability of a diet is also an aspect that is taken into consideration when making national recommendations today and a healthy diet, meaning one with a high content of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain products and a low content of red and processed meats, is generally more sustainable. The report finds that the development in Norwegian eating habits between 2008 and 2018 has been mixed. Sugar and milk consumption declined, that of vegetables increased, consumption of meat decreased slightly, while that of fish fell considerably. In 2018, Norwegians ate 2.6 times more meat than fish, a figure that was 2.2 in 2008.

Thursday, 01 January 2015 00:00

Rich resources could be better exploited

The fishery and aquaculture sector in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) includes artisanal and recreational fisheries on marine and inland waters. The main types of aquaculture production systems are pond, tank and cage cultures. Farmed production is predominantly fish, with only a small cultivation of molluscs.

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