Displaying items by tag: sustainable

EM4 20 LaszloNACCEE encourages young professionals’ participation

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 4 / 2020.

Dr Laszlo Varadi has been involved in the freshwater aquaculture sector for a lifetime. Retiring as director of HAKI, the Hungarian Research Institute for Fisheries and Aquaculture, though still attached as an International Advisor, he is today the President of the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Central-Eastern Europe (NACCEE) and also works at the Department of Public Policy and Management at Corvinus University in Budapest. He shares here some of his opinions about the sector and its future.

HAKI, an institution that you led for many years, plays a key role in the development of Hungarian aquaculture by research into aquaculture, fish biology, and aquatic ecology. Could you envisage HAKI diversifying into other fields of research further down the value chain?

Published in Opinions

NWWAC picThe North Western Waters Advisory Council (NWWAC) is one of the EU’s 11 fisheries advisory councils. Established under the Common Fisheries Policy the advisory councils are fora for dialogue between stakeholders in the fisheries sector in the areas they represent. The NWWAC advises on matters related to fisheries management in ICES areas 5b, 6 and 7 (EC offshore waters within the EEZ of Ireland, part of the United Kingdom and France). Early this year the NWWAC hosted a workshop “Re-imagining Gear in a Circular Economy” in Brussels in conjunction with the Baltic Sea Advisory Council, North Sea Advisory Council and Pelagic Advisory Council. Discussion at the workshop focused on the fishing gear component of recently introduced EU legislation, specifically the design, monitoring, collection and disposal of fishing gear.

Around 50 participants from 10 EU Member States discussed the challenges faced by the fishing sector relating to the proposed measures. These include the proposed introduction of an Extended Producer Responsibility Scheme, under which producers of fishing gear cover the costs of the separate collection of waste fishing gear and its subsequent transport and treatment, as well as the envisaged standardisation of gear, relating to the circular design of fishing gear to encourage preparation for re-use and to facilitate recyclability at end-of-life, and the overall lack of data regarding volumes of end-of-life gear and current recycling rates.

Clear recommendations from the workshop include the need for a full lifecycle analysis of the various types of fishing gear, as well as a complete supply chain analysis in order to arrive at a clear picture of the scale of the issue. While communication and awareness raising within the sector are paramount, it is vital that all stakeholders at local, national and EU levels coordinate their approach, as this issue falls within multiple policy areas, namely fisheries, waste management and circular economy.

The full report is available here: http://www.nwwac.org/_fileupload/Minutes%20and%20Reports/2020/Gear%20Workshop/FINAL%20Report%20AC%20Gear%20Workshop%202020_EN.pdf. For French or Spanish translations, enter the relevant version of the website at www.nwwac.org and visit the publications section.

For further information call Mo Mathies, Deputy Executive Secretary, NWWAC, at +353 1 2144 143 or write This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

NWWAC logo

 

Published in Latest News

NWWAC picThe North Western Waters Advisory Council (NWWAC) is one of the EU’s 11 fisheries advisory councils. Established under the Common Fisheries Policy the advisory councils are fora for dialogue between stakeholders in the fisheries sector in the areas they represent. The NWWAC advises on matters related to fisheries management in ICES areas 5b, 6 and 7 (EC offshore waters within the EEZ of Ireland, part of the United Kingdom and France). Early this year the NWWAC hosted a workshop “Re-imagining Gear in a Circular Economy” in Brussels in conjunction with the Baltic Sea Advisory Council, North Sea Advisory Council and Pelagic Advisory Council. Discussion at the workshop focused on the fishing gear component of recently introduced EU legislation, specifically the design, monitoring, collection and disposal of fishing gear.

Around 50 participants from 10 EU Member States discussed the challenges faced by the fishing sector relating to the proposed measures. These include the proposed introduction of an Extended Producer Responsibility Scheme, under which producers of fishing gear cover the costs of the separate collection of waste fishing gear and its subsequent transport and treatment, as well as the envisaged standardisation of gear, relating to the circular design of fishing gear to encourage preparation for re-use and to facilitate recyclability at end-of-life, and the overall lack of data regarding volumes of end-of-life gear and current recycling rates.

Clear recommendations from the workshop include the need for a full lifecycle analysis of the various types of fishing gear, as well as a complete supply chain analysis in order to arrive at a clear picture of the scale of the issue. While communication and awareness raising within the sector are paramount, it is vital that all stakeholders at local, national and EU levels coordinate their approach, as this issue falls within multiple policy areas, namely fisheries, waste management and circular economy.

The full report is available here: http://www.nwwac.org/_fileupload/Minutes%20and%20Reports/2020/Gear%20Workshop/FINAL%20Report%20AC%20Gear%20Workshop%202020_EN.pdf. For French or Spanish translations, enter the relevant version of the website at www.nwwac.org and visit the publications section.

For further information call Mo Mathies, Deputy Executive Secretary, NWWAC, at +353 1 2144 143 or write This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

NWWAC logo

 

Published in Frontpage rotator

EM2 20 News Int AuchanFrench retail group Auchan, one of the world’s largest retailers, is introducing a groundbreaking trout, raised on a novel feed by Skretting enriched with algal oil from Veramaris and insect meal from InnovaFeed. For the first time, the entire value chain has come together to create a unique consumer offer, combining farming, feed efficiency, and alternative ingredients. Together, they achieved a significant boost of the nutritional value from the algal oils, while ingeniously replacing the feed fish with insect meal and fish trimmings. It’s the sustainable usage of a previously discarded resource.

Published in Latest News

EM2 20 News Int aquaculture1The European Parliament held a stakeholder meeting on the current challenges facing the aquaculture sector, with emphasis on production. The speakers included fish farmers representing marine aquaculture in the Atlantic and the Mediterranean to pond farming in the Czech Republic, with additional experts from Hungary, Belgium, and Croatia.

Dr. Halasi-Kovács of the NAIK Research Institute for Fisheries and Aquaculture in Hungary underlined in his presentation, the potential of freshwater aquaculture. Presenting some general trends in the EU, he said, 85% of aquaculture production originates from marine sources while only 12 percent is from freshwater production. Production from pond aquaculture has not grown in the last decade within the EU, although globally freshwater aquaculture production constitutes 60 percent of total farmed fish production, while marine production contributes less than 30 percent.

Published in Latest News
Wednesday, 18 December 2019 10:10

Glimpsing the future of processing

EM6 19 Tech WhitefishMarel, a leading producer of sophisticated equipment for the fish processing industry, held its annual demonstration of machinery for whitefish processing at its dedicated demo centre, Progress Point, in Kastrup close to the Copenhagen airport. The event brought together existing and potential customers from all around the world as well as partners, Marel employees, and representatives from the press. The guests were treated to a day of equipment demonstrations and presentations both by Marel employees and external experts about some of the important trends shaping the future development of the industry.

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 6/2019.

Published in Technology

Image credit: FAO/Pier Paolo CitoThe world needs a new vision for fisheries in the 21st century, said Qu Dongyu, FAO Director General in his speech at the opening of the International Symposium on Fisheries Sustainability. The projected increase in global population to 10bn by 2050 will call for greater aquatic food production, he said, but without jeopardising the health of oceans and rivers, and while improving the social conditions of those dependent on fisheries, who are often the poorest in society. Although millions depend on fisheries for food and livelihoods the state of the world’s oceans is one of grave concern from the impacts of plastic pollution, climate change, overfishing and habitat degradation. Globally over one in ten people depend on fisheries to make a living and to feed their families, while one in three marine fish stocks is overfished.

Published in Latest News

IT lInternational food processors and retailers were invited by Sealed Air to the company’s brand-new Milan Packforum in June this year for an update on how the market is changing from commodity to premium products and how industry players manage to do so while improving their green credentials. At the event, Rabobank – a leading international bank with a mission to promote greater sustainability in food production – showed that adding value to products and following convenience trends are key factors for retailers to succeed. Rabobank demonstrated this using the example of salmon, which now shows the highest consumption among all proteins thanks to products being innovative, convenient for consumers and packaged for premium positioning.

Published in Latest News

EM1 19 News Int loveThe Eurobarometer, a survey since 1973 of economic and social indicators, operated by the European Commission, has found, once again, that Europeans love fish. European Commissioner for the Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Karmenu Vella reacted to the most recent report by highlighting the importance of ensuring the sustainability of European fisheries so that “…our citizens can enjoy these tasty products in the long term.” Considerable progress has been made in this regard over the last years, he said, adding that aquaculture too played an important role, “farmed fish from the EU is a sustainable source of protein and other nutrients. In a low-carbon society, its role will only increase.” Europeans spend twice as much, per person, on fish than do Americans because, according to the survey of people’s opinion, most (74% of survey respondents) find it healthy, and tasty. Europeans also prefer the local fishmonger, who sells local fish, rather than other retail channels, where the fish may be imported, and where the seller may not be as acquainted with seafood, how to treat it, recipes, and so on. Fishmongers also often offer a more varied assortment of seafood, which the survey respondents also valued. Trust was another issue, the respondents also indicated they felt greater confidence in their seafood purchases because of the strict EU rules on product quality, labelling, and other benefits.

Published in Latest News
Monday, 04 December 2017 10:00

Europe’s mussel farmers face multiple hurdles

EM6 17 TM musselsIncreasing sustainable production will call for concerted efforts

The case study “Mussel Farming” has been investigated in the framework of the European project SUCCESS (Horizon 2020) along with other aquaculture case studies. This overview of the European mussel farming sector is based on a presentation given during the workshop at Cattolica (Italy) in May 2017 and relies on preliminary outputs of the project regarding this aquaculture sector.

Globally, the production of farmed mussels has exceeded that from the wild since the end of the 1950s, and the volume share of capture fisheries fell below 10% in 2005. In the EU, mussel farming and fisheries are well-established sectors in some countries, but have exhibited a downward production trend since the beginning of the century, whereas they are still expanding in other parts of the world. The volume share of production in the EU progressively decreased from 47% to 27% over the period 2000-2015; in the meantime, China’s share rose substantially from 30% to 42% and the contribution of Chile grew from 2% to 12% thanks to the development of aquaculture (FAO Fishstat).

Published in Trade and Markets