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Image credit: FAO/Pier Paolo CitoThe world needs a new vision for fisheries in the 21st century, said Qu Dongyu, FAO Director General in his speech at the opening of the International Symposium on Fisheries Sustainability. The projected increase in global population to 10bn by 2050 will call for greater aquatic food production, he said, but without jeopardising the health of oceans and rivers, and while improving the social conditions of those dependent on fisheries, who are often the poorest in society. Although millions depend on fisheries for food and livelihoods the state of the world’s oceans is one of grave concern from the impacts of plastic pollution, climate change, overfishing and habitat degradation. Globally over one in ten people depend on fisheries to make a living and to feed their families, while one in three marine fish stocks is overfished.

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FAO symposiumTo understand and interpret two distinct and opposing trends in global marine and inland fisheries FAO is organising a symposium on 18-21 November 2019 in Rome. The crucial and growing contribution fisheries make to food, nutrition and livelihood security represents one trend, while the overall decrease in the proportion of marine fish stocks caught within biologically sustainable levels especially in least developed regions, represents the other. Given these developments the symposium aims to identify the challenges to improve the sustainability of fish resources, establish the status of global and regional fisheries sustainability, define what constitutes evidence and discuss how to ensure an evidence basis for decision making, and finally outline what society expects from marine and inland fisheries in the 21st century. The debates and conclusions will contribute to the development of a new vision for the way capture fisheries are perceived and used, showing how the sector can respond to the complex and rapidly changing challenges facing society.

The symposium will be technical in nature is aimed at senior employees at technical organisations, academics from the natural and social sciences, fisheries, conservation and sustainability experts, representatives from private industry, fisheries administrations, NGOs, intergovernmental organisations, and indigenous groups. Attendance to the event is free, but subject to an application process to limit the audience to 500 delegates (the size of the venue), while safeguarding a balanced representation from the groups mentioned above. More information is available at the symposium webpage, http://www.fao.org/about/meetings/sustainable-fisheries-symposium/en/ or from Dr Manuel Barange, FAO Director Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Resources Division, and Symposium Convenor, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or Dr Vera Agostini, FAO Deputy Director Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Resources Division, and Chair of the Symposium Local Organizing Committee, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Danube Conference2018The FAO, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development in Romania, EUROFISH, DSTF, and EIFAAC are arranging a conference in Bucharest, Romania on 13-15 November titled Regional Conference on River habitat restoration for inland fisheries in the Danube River basin and adjacent Black Sea areas. The event will hold sessions on valuing inland fisheries resources, conservation and management, regulatory framework, along with shared country experiences from the region. The event will not only attract participants from the involved countries but is also expected to be visited with representatives from Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan. Speakers and programme information is available at danube-conference.eurofish.dk

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EM5 17 TM Small pelagics Grethe Hillersoey Norwegian Seafood CouncilGlobal landings of small pelagics are expected to grow by seven percent in 2017 compared with 2016. The major reason for this growth is an expected higher catch of Peruvian anchovy. Catches of Atlantic mackerel and Atlantic herring are also expected to increase.

The combined increase for herring and mackerel landings in 2017 is expected to be about 4 percent more than in 2016. This could put some pressure on prices, but since the increase is relatively modest, no dramatic price changes are expected. Instead, exchange rates may play a greater role in price determination.

Published in Trade and Markets