Displaying items by tag: fisheries

RusExpoAquaWith the ongoing development of the aqua- and mariculture in Russia,Seafood Expo Russia will host a new specialized Aquaculture section that will unite fish farmers, feed,additives, and equipments suppliers, and other stakeholders.

“We always wanted aquaculture to become a separate sector and now we have such opportunity. This industry always needed its own platform to keep the dialog going. Our main aim is to help aquaculture companies to find new partners and clients. That’s why we want to gather all the existing parts of production and supply chain in one place.” said Altana Esinova, head of the new sector.

Published in Latest News

EM6 20 News Int AzerbaijanFAO and the Turkish Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry organised the first serial webinars as part of the Capacity Development for Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture Management in Central Asia (FISHCap) project. The web-based seminars will be organised on a monthly basis, and cover Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. The series of webinars aims to provide a brief update of the state of fisheries and aquaculture in the countries and will offer a forum for discussions and networking by stakeholders.

Published in Latest News

EM6 2020Eurofish Magazine issue 6 2020 features the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in Poland, Romania and Bulgaria. The Aquaculture section looks at pioneering shrimp cultivation in Turkey.
Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator

November / December 2020 EUROFISH Magazine 6
Country profile: Poland,Romania, Bulgaria
Aquaculture: Is this the start of Turkey’s shrimp farming industry? - Pioneering cultivation of a new species
Fisheries:
Improving EU fisheries controls - A Sisyphean task for fisheries management
Technology: Fish counters set the stage for seafood sales - Maintaining freshness and quality stimulates purchases
Guest pages: Marie Christine Montfort - Women in the Seafood Industry fights for gender equality in fisheries and aquaculture - Redressing a persistent imbalances

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues

Oussama Kheriji, former Minister of Agriculture, Water Resources, and Fisheries, TunisiaWith almost 2 300 km of coastline, 40 fishing ports and a further two under construction, fishing occupies an important position at the socio-economic level in Tunisia. It is an activity deeply rooted in Tunisian culture and traditions, particularly among coastal populations. Fish and seafood make a major contribution to the protein food balance of a large segment of the population; the average Tunisian consumes 11 kg of seafood per year.

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 5 / 2020.

Oussama Kheriji, former Minister of Agriculture, Water Resources, and Fisheries addresses some of the issues facing the Tunisian fisheries and aquaculture sector.

Published in Tunisia

EM5 2020 LV T1This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 5 / 2020.

As in other countries the pandemic’s impact on the hotel, restaurant, and catering sector was brutal. Producers of canned fish products, an important part of the Latvian processing industry, however experienced an uptick in demand as consumers took to stockpiling shelf stable goods and those with long expiry dates in the early days of the virus’ spread. The canning sector forms an important part of the Latvian fish processing sector with a tradition that goes back over a century. Today there are a handful of large companies that are the main producers and exporters of canned products down from some 20 firms a couple of decades ago. These companies belong to the Union of Latvian Fish Processing Industry, an association that decides the criteria behind the label Riga sprats in oil, which the companies use to market their canned sprats. The raw material for this well-known product, exports of which go around the world, comes from the Baltic Sea. The canning industry faced a crisis in 2015 when Russia embargoed canned products from Latvia. Since Russia was the single most important market for several producers this development contributed to the restructuring and consolidation among canned fish producers. Since then canneries have expanded their export markets mainly to the EU, but also to other countries such as Canada, Japan, and the US. Processing facilities are certified to EU standards, but also to other international standards such as International Featured Standards (IFS), British Retail Consortium (BRC), or GOST (for Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) countries). Cans account for only part of the output from the processing sector, other products include smoked, salted, and preserved fish. According to the 2019 STECF report on the EU fish processing sector, Latvian processors are active importers and exporters of fish and seafood. Data from the Central Statistics Bureau of Latvia show that exports of processed fish products increased steadily in value from 2016 to reach EUR93m in 2019, a growth of 42% over the period, while volumes increased by 17%.On the other hand, the export value of fresh, chilled or frozen fish declined 11% to EUR73m. Raw materials, other than those available from Latvia’s Baltic Sea catches, are supplied by other countries. Imports of chilled or frozen fish between 2016 and 2019 increased 2% in value to EUR128m, while the volume actually fell 4% to 64,000 tonnes. The main trading partners for supply of raw material are Denmark, Estonia, Lithuania and Poland.

Published in Latvia

EM5 2020Eurofish Magazine issue 5 2020 features the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in Latvia and Tunisia. The Aquaculture section looks at water reduction.
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Published in Frontpage rotator

September / October 2020 EUROFISH Magazine 5
Country profile: Latvia, Tunisia
Aquaculture: Water of drinkable quality is becoming increasingly scarce - Aquaculture must reduce its water consumption
Processing:
Value potential of many seafood products is not sufficiently exploited - Sustainable utilisation saves resources
Technology: Netting solutions for the aquaculture industry
Guest pages: Antonella Vassallo - The International Ocean Institute is dedicated to the peaceful, equitable, and sustainable use of the oceans

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues

EM4 20 BlockchainA new basis for international business

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 4 / 2020.

“Blockchain” is for many people still little more than a buzzword they may have heard about in connection with the digital currency bitcoins. But in fact blockchain and artificial intelligence are developing into leading technologies that are “revolutionizing” many areas of the economy. Blockchains provide transparency, enable more control, and simplify traceability in business relationships.

Published in Technology

EM4 20 DenmarkRegulatory conditions have improved the last years

This article was features in EUROFISH Magazine 4 / 2020.

The regulatory framework under which the small-scale fishery in Denmark operates has gone through several changes over the last years. The revisions seek to secure its future, make it even more sustainable, and give young people an incentive to join.

It is just after 05.30 as the vessel leaves the harbour on a clear calm morning at the end of May. The sea is utterly still and Morten Krogh, a young coastal fisher, busies himself in the cabin pulling on oilskins and filling out his logbook as the boat pulls out. The vessel is sailing from Vedbæk, north of Copenhagen, along the Sound (Øresund), the narrow channel of water between the west coast of southern Sweden and northern part of Zealand, the largest Danish island. Vedbæk is one of some 50 Danish harbours that are part of havfriskfisk (literally, sea-fresh fish). Started in 2012, it is a website (www.havfriskfisk.dk) that enables consumers interested in fish straight from the sea to sign up to receive a text message. The SMS announces the arrival time of the vessel and the species for sale. The species vary slightly from season to season but cod and plaice are staples with turbot, brill, mackerel, and the odd sea trout available in spring and early summer, as well as cod and lumpfish roe in the first quarter of the year. Fishers like Morten Krogh use the facility to sell their catch to consumers without involving middlemen—a win-win situation for fisher and consumer alike.

Published in Denmark
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