Displaying items by tag: fish

EM4 19 News lab salmonFalling fish population across the world are prompting innovators to look to the lab to find new ways at producing inexpensive fish products. Globally, demand for salmon has skyrocketed, along with demand for all fish, fueling overfishing and threatening the stocks of many fisheries. Fish and seafood now account for almost a fifth of the animal protein people consume making the need for a solution to a potential seafood shortage urgent. Maynard, United States based AquaBounty Technologies is hoping its genetically modified version of Atlantic salmon, which is says grows twice as fast as normal salmon, will soon become a top consumer choice. The company raises the salmon in land-based production systems that eliminate the various risks to wild fish, humans and the environment posed by farmed salmon.

Published in Latest News
Friday, 09 August 2019 08:55

Turkish aquaculture exports increase

EM4 19 News Int DSC9330 1 copy copyTurkeys aquaculture exports during this season reached $582.2 million, a 9 percent increase compared to the same period last year according to the Eastern Black Sea Exports Association. Some 118,954 tonnes of aquaculture products were exported between September 1 and April 15, 2019.The Netherlands, Japan and Italy were the leading export destinations for frozen fish fillets from Turkey

Published in Latest News
Friday, 09 August 2019 08:53

Hungary to build large indoor fish farm

Hungary has revealed plans to build a new carbon-neutral greenhouse-filled farming city that will be powered by renewable energy sources. The farming city will include one of Europe’s largest indoor fish farming facilities. The €1 billion agricultural center will adjoin the border between Hungary, Austria and Slovakia. It will cover 330 hectares – equivalent to 500 football pitches.

Published in Latest News

EM4 19 News warm oceans biomass lostThe world’s oceans will likely lose one-sixth of their fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues its current trajectory, a new study finds. Every degree Celsius that the world’s oceans warm, the total mass of sea animals is projected to drop by 5% according to a comprehensive computer-based study by an international team of marine biologists at the American National Academy of Sciences. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changes special report on global warming already estimates that as of 2017, human activities were responsible for global mean temperature rise of one degree Celsius above preindustrial levels. Unless reductions are made by the world’s leading carbon emitters the world will likely warm by two degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels by 2100.

Published in Latest News

CEM3 19 TM Russia consumption DSC 9060onsumer survey yields vital insights in consumer habits

The second Global Fishery Forum, which was held on 13-15 September 2018 in St. Petersburg, Russia, offered an extensive programme covering various emerging topics from global fishing activities and projections for 2050, development of aquaculture, global consumer markets, technologies, and popularisation of Russian fish products.

During the second day of the Global Fishery Forum, the conference “Russian fish: a strategy for promoting Russian fish on the Russian market”, gathered experts for discussion on how to increase fish consumption. The main questions looked at understanding what Russian consumers eat and what producers are offering them, consumer awareness and the role of mass-media in this process, what can be done to stimulate consumer demand on the market, and opportunities for retail chains to increase consumption of fisheries products in the country.   

Herring is the most-consumed fish in Russia

In 2016, consumption of fish and seafood products in Russia was at 21.1 kg per capita (live weight equivalent), according to the research carried out by the All-Russian Association of Fish Breeders, Entrepreneurs and Exporters (VARPE). The market size was estimated at more than 3 million tonnes of fisheries products. Herring was the leading species with 2.81 kg per capita consumption, followed by salmon species (2.73 kg per capita), Alaska pollock (2.59 kg per capita), cod (2 kg per capita) and mackerel (1.9 kg per capita). These 5 top species make up 12 kg per capita or more than 56% of all fish and seafood products in the country. Consumption of squid, shrimp and crab was about 0.6, 0.25 and 0.14 kg per capita respectively, representing about 5% of the total fish and seafood consumption in the country. 

Published in Trade and Markets
Wednesday, 13 December 2017 13:07

Europe's carp farming needs new marketing ideas

Farmed fish with a long history and an uncertain future

EM6 17 common carpThe common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is not only one of the best-known but also one of the most frequently produced freshwater food fishes. Nearly 4.2 million tonnes of this species were reared in carp ponds or in polyculture in 2014, plus a further 150,000 tonnes from fishing. Carp were already popular as food fish in the ancient world, and in Central Europe centuries-old carp fishing ponds are today part of the cultural landscape.

The original distribution area of common carp is in the warm temperate regions of South East Europe and Asia from the Black Sea, through Asia Minor and China, to Japan. The Romans introduced the species to Central Europe about 2,000 years ago and today it is to be found all over Europe, with the exception of Scandinavia. Within this extensive area, however, the species structure is widely controversial. Some taxonomists distinguish four subspecies whose core centres are thought to be found from the Danube River basin to the Ural Mountain range, in the Aral Sea, in the Amur River basin to southern China, and in the waters of North Vietnam. Other experts differentiate only two subspecies – C. c. carpio and C. c. haematopterus, while a third group sees rather a uniform species status. Morphological methods alone hardly enable any satisfactory distinction for, with regard to its body shape, the common carp is one of the most variable freshwater fish species.

Published in Species
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