Displaying items by tag: fisheries

Thursday, 16 April 2020 08:57

The seafood sector in Saudi Arabia

 EM 2 20 Saudi Arabia aquacultureA vision for growth is being realised

This article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 2 2020.

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is famous for its vast oil reserves, a quarter of the world’s total, and for the dominance of its economy by petroleum and associated industries. However, growing diversification of the Saudi economy has benefited some sectors. In agriculture the Kingdom is now self-sufficient in the production of milk, eggs, wheat, and other commodities. In addition, the country is a major exporter of fruits, vegetables, dairy products and fish and seafood to markets around the world.

Published in Saudi Arabia

EM 2 20 Alicia Villauriz IglesiasThis article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 2 2020.
Dña. Alicia Villauriz Iglesias, the Secretary General for Fisheries, has a long history at top levels of the administration of the Spanish agriculture, fisheries, and food sectors with experience both from within Spain and outside. She outlines here some of the issues facing the Spanish fisheries sector and the measures her administration is taking to address them.

Published in Spain

EM2 2020Eurofish Magazine issue 2 2020 features the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in Spain, Estonia and Saudi Arabia. The Aquaculture section looks using less fishmeal in aquafeed.

Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator
Tuesday, 07 April 2020 07:30

Eurofish Magazine Issue 2 2020 (March / April)

March / April 2020 EM 2
Country profile: Spain, Estonia, Saudi Arabia
Events: Fish International, Salmon ShowHow
Aquaculture:
Importance of fishmeal for aquafeed continues to decline - More and more vegetable feed components are being used
Technology: Reduce plastics and waste with sustainable labelling and banding
Guest pages: Dr Manuel Barange - Climate change impacts on aquatic ecosystems are modulated by other forcing factors - Reducing overall stress boosts resilience to climate change

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues

FAO Policy Brief COVID 19As with other sectors of the global economy, fisheries and aquaculture are also being affected by the spread of COVID-19. Producers, processors, traders, and consumers are both directly and indirectly feeling the impact of the virus, the consequences of which, particularly for populations that depend heavily on seafood for food security and nutrition, can be severe. FAO has therefore released a brief on how COVID-19 is affecting the fisheries and aquaculture sector and suggested measures to support the different players in the supply chain. Production, for instance, may suffer from the imposition of sanitary measures on board that make fishing difficult, crews may not be able to join their vessels due to travel restrictions, and the necessary supplies of bait or ice may not be available. In addition, demand in some countries has fallen as a result of unfounded perceptions about links between COVID-19 and seafood. Aquaculture production is affected by the closure of markets, the shutdown of the HORECA sector, and restrictions on flights and cargo movements. In the processing sector issues with cross border transport, uncertain supply of raw materials, and market restriction are among the challenges companies must face. COVID-19 is also likely to have an impact on fisheries management and policy as stock assessments, fisheries observer programmes, and science and management meetings may all be postponed or cancelled. Measures to support the different elements in the supply chain extend from expanding government purchases of seafood to maintain demand and prevent a slump in prices to extending credit and microfinance facilities to fish farmers to ensuring smooth passage of goods at ports, rail terminals, and at border crossings. The complete brief is available at http://www.fao.org/documents/card/en/c/ca8637en

Published in Latest News
Friday, 03 April 2020 14:59

Implications of the COVID-19 pandemic

CoronaThe COVID-19 pandemic continues to have profound implications, shaping global demand and altering the supply patterns of many industries, not least the fisheries and aquaculture sector.
Fish and fish products need to move across borders with no restrictions, while in compliance with the existing measures to protect consumers’ health.


In order to assist the sector, GLOBEFISH will soon start disseminating a periodical newsletter covering past, current and future impacts of the pandemic on fisheries and aquaculture through the contribution of multiple participants in the value chain in different parts of the world.


In this regard, GLOBEFISH would greatly appreciate external input by responding to a short questionnaire.

The information collected will form a key basis for assessment and enable the industry to better access current information. Please note that all answers will be treated confidentially, and data will only be reported at aggregate levels.


The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is continuously monitoring and sharing information on the COVID-19, particularly possible disruptions in the food supply chain and challenges in terms of logistics. GLOBEFISH is part of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department of FAO, responsible for providing up-to-date market and trade information on fish and fish products.

Published in Frontpage rotator
Friday, 03 April 2020 14:51

Implications of the COVID-19 pandemic

CoronaThe COVID-19 pandemic continues to have profound implications, shaping global demand and altering the supply patterns of many industries, not least the fisheries and aquaculture sector.
Fish and fish products need to move across borders with no restrictions, while in compliance with the existing measures to protect consumers’ health.


In order to assist the sector, GLOBEFISH will soon start disseminating a periodical newsletter covering past, current and future impacts of the pandemic on fisheries and aquaculture through the contribution of multiple participants in the value chain in different parts of the world.


In this regard, GLOBEFISH would greatly appreciate external input by responding to a short questionnaire.

The information collected will form a key basis for assessment and enable the industry to better access current information. Please note that all answers will be treated confidentially, and data will only be reported at aggregate levels.


The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is continuously monitoring and sharing information on the COVID-19, particularly possible disruptions in the food supply chain and challenges in terms of logistics. GLOBEFISH is part of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department of FAO, responsible for providing up-to-date market and trade information on fish and fish products.

Published in Latest News

EM2 20 News Int BalticLow quotas over several years due to a critical decline in cod and herring stocks challenge both commercial and recreational fisheries financially with declining revenues and fewer angler tourists fishing for cod. Representatives from the business community, the research establishment, municipalities, green organisations, and politicians are being gathered by the Danish government to lay the groundwork for an action plan for future fisheries in the Baltic Sea. Although fishing pressure has eased considerably since 2000 and quotas are the lowest in many years, cod and herring stocks in the Baltic have declined to the point where the future of fishing in the Baltic Sea is uncertain.

Published in Latest News

EM1 20 UZAmbitious strategy charts out aquaculture development

This article was featured in EUROFISH Magazine 1/2020

Fish production in the Republic of Uzbekistan comes primarily from inland capture fishing and fish farming. The latter is mainly the extensive pond production of silver carp and common carp, but plans are afoot to expand this to other species using water-conserving technologies.

Uzbekistan is a landlocked country situated in the middle of Central Asia and has an area of about 450,000 km2. The country has a typical inland climate with marked seasonal temperature fluctuations, i.e. hot summers and cold winters. The average temperature in summer is about 27 оС often rising to more than 40 оС in the daytime, while the average temperature in February is -6 to -8 оС.

Better care of water resources would increase sector potential

Published in Uzbekistan

EM1 20 AlgaeMicroalgae are of fundamental importance for life in the oceans. With their photosynthesis they are the first link in the marine food chains upon which the existence of life in the oceans is based. Under certain conditions, however, uncontrolled mass development of the tiny algae can occur. The resulting algal blooms often have serious ecological and economic consequences and can even be toxic.

This article was featured in EM 1 / 2020.

Published in Aquaculture
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